More Editors/IDE’s

In my last post I talked about not being able to find a good Python editor/IDE other than vim. Nothing has really changed since then but there was another editor and IDE that was brought to my attention which I failed to point out. Let’s talk about them!

Editors/IDE’s

Emacs

While talking with Tim Bielawa I was reminded about Emacs since it’s what Tim uses. Emacs has such amazing integration that people sometimes say it’s an operating system itself! I’ve really only ever given Emacs two real shots at being my main editor. The first time was when I was just starting to get into programming and was reading a lot about what other programmers and system administrators used. At first it seemed a lot easier than vi but I ended up running with vi/vim since, at the very least, vi seemed to always be present on every Linux/BSD box I worked with by default. The second attempt was after I promised a few Emacs users at work that I’d give it another fair shot. I said I would use Emacs when I’d normally use vim for a full week knowing that it would force me to learn more about the editor. It wasn’t easy to stop trying to use mode editing but I was able to code without feeling too contained by the editor (Note: the contained feeling was me not knowing the editor well, not Emacs itself. It was really obvious that Emacs is a powerful editor). My biggest gripes from the week long test were around needing to install emacs on systems for use (which is sort of a silly one, I admit) and I felt some of the commands were way to long. I don’t remember the last one off the top of my head but I do remember that one command had a bunch of dashes and was frustrating every time I needed to use it. I think it’s about time I try it again and see if I can overcome my hurdles trying to use it efficiently. Who knows, maybe third time’s the charm!

Cloud9

Cloud9 is really cool. It’s not your grandfather’s IDE by any stretch. As the name implies the application exists out in the cloud (They use Openshift). I love the idea that I can start editing code with full IDE features from any machine I’m currently occupying. I have not tried using Cloud9 with a tablet (with keyboard of course!) yet but if that works then this thing would have rockstar status in my mind. I’ve used it for a few projects for both ease of use and to test out some of the features Cloud9 boasts. Being that it is on Openshift the IDE has it’s own platform letting you install tools and dependencies. There are also some collaboration features which I have not tried out yet mainly because I’m not sure how that works when you are using Github (IE: can they push code under your name or are they restricted?). I would use Cloud9 a lot more if it wasn’t for the Internet. While Cloud9 is pretty responsive in most cases but due to some point in the network connection between “here” and “there” things slow down or stop responding for a second or two. If this was something other than coding I probably wouldn’t care that much … but this is coding. Any hiccups while editing breaks concentration and slows down progress. One other issue I noticed was the lack of preferences across ones instances. Say you have two projects in Cloud9. Each project has it’s own IDE instance. If you want to set preferences for both IDE instances you will have to open each on it’s own and set them. You can not set any kind of global default preferences for all your instances. Hopefully they will add that functionality as I’m pretty positive I’m not the only person who finds that a bit weird. Over time Cloud9 and similar IDE’s will find ways to speed up and add better preference support but until then, in my mind, Cloud9 is straddling the line between full contender and really cool tech preview to keep my eye on.

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Python IDE Woes

I love  the Python programming language. I could spend hours explaining why it’s generally my go to language when coding something new but that’s not what I really want to touch on today. Today it’s about IDEs and editors.

IDE or editor selection is almost a cultish exercise. Developers break out into small societies around coding tools and banish those exhibiting wandering eyes towards  tool lust. In some cases I’ve fallen into those patterns when I find a tool that I enjoy. It can be frustrating to have to uproot your development workflow to accommodate a new tool even when it’s obvious that after the initial learning curve the tool will make life easier. With all that said I am not stuck to any IDE or editor. I’m an IDE/editor swinger.

There are plenty of choices for Python, many of which I’ve used throughout the years. My problem is that all of those I’ve tried I always end up moving away from to one of the default editors: vim or emacs (in my case vim). For the heck of it this post is to go through the main reasons for the most recent movements back to vim.

IDEs and Editors

Eclipse

I used to joke that every 6 months I’d give Eclipse a try. It’s very popular in the Java programming world and has a great Python plugin called PyDev. However, Eclipse itself always feels sluggish even when I’m writing Java. Keep in mind I’m not on some old hardware which is limiting the IDE nor am I doing some corner case kind of usage. The sluggishness is not terrible either, but it’s noticeable reminding me that I’m using a very large piece of software. One of my thoughts is that if I notice the IDE/editor for anything other than a helpful feature then there is likely a problem.

NetBeans

NetBeans is not all that different than Eclipse in my mind. It’s a Java IDE which is extendable to other languages. Last time I tried NetBeans it was less sluggish than Eclipse. My main issue with NetBeans is I can never tell what is going one with the IDE. There was a pretty big push for first class Python support in NetBeans. I played with that IDE version for a while and, overall, liked it. Now searching python on the NetBeans site returns nothing. It seems like there are random community efforts to bring Python back into NetBeans but I want something that works well right now (no offense to any of the efforts!).

PyCharm

Another similar IDE is PyCharm. I have at least one fellow Python developer which swears by PyCharm and I can see why. It doesn’t seem sluggish even though it’s pretty large. It has a good feature set. But it has confusing proprietary licensing and the IDE is specific to the language. If you need to get some Ruby coding done then it’s a different JetBrains IDE and, I assume, another purchase and license agreement. That’s a bit frustrating!

Komodo IDE

Komodo IDE was one of the earlier Python IDEs I tried.  I have to admit not trying it in a while, but last time I played with it I felt it was sluggish in a similar way to Eclipse. Like Eclipse it has a lot of plugins/add-ons available which is great but, then again, it’s proprietary and costs $382. Sort of a long term deal breaker right there.

Komodo Edit

The younger brother of Komodo IDE, Komodo Edit actually feels more useable to me. I believe it’s just the basic core of Komodo IDE, but that works in it’s favor. It seemed faster and kept out of my way. The initial start screen always feels clunky. However, the license is weird and is not listed on the FSF or OSI list. I guess it’s proprietary? Confusion is not a good thing.

Sublime Text

This one kills me. Sublime Text is a fantastic editor. I really like it! The editor is very fast and has some unique features. It’s available on all three major computer platforms (Linux, Windows and OS X). The license is proprietary but is simple, understandable. I believe this may be a first. Though the fact it’s proprietary makes it a harder editor to make my default. If Sublime Text was Free Software or Open Source it would be my programming default editor.

Scribes

This was a nice editor. I say was for Scribes because it looks like it is no longer actively developed. It’s a shame because it was a powerful and fast editor with an Open license. Even though it’s an older editor than Sublime Text I liked it for a lot of the same reasons. If this was still being worked on it would be my default programming editor.

PIDA

PIDA was my default IDE for a while. If I was using an IDE it was likely to be PIDA. It was Open, had good plugins, fast, embedded Vim as the editor, said it loved me, etc.. However, the PIDA web site has disappeared and the last stable release was about 3 years ago. It seems like a8 may be the replacement but I’ve not had time to run with it yet.

Others To Look At

As I stated before I’d like to spend some time with a8. It looks like it’s X based only (Linux, BSD, etc..) which is fine for me since most all of my dev is on Linux. I’ve also seen a lot of talk about Ninja IDE and it looks promising though I’m generally not a fan of specific language IDEs since I am not always using the same language.

What Do You Use?

Seriously. If you are doing Python development regularly what are you using and why? What features have you found to be amazing and which ones are overrated marketing dribble? Am I the only guy who continues to go back to vim in this day and age?